Protecting your furniture from cat scratching

We all have a lot of furniture that we want to take care of but unfortunately, our pets do things that can damage them, particularly our cat. Cats do this, not because they want it but it’s because of what their instincts tell them to do. They do this to remove their old claw sheathes and to mark objects with scent glands in their paws. But then, there are still a lot of ways on how we can avoid further damage to our furniture, without taking the drastic way of having our pet cat declawed.


You may buy a double-sided tape, any brand will do. Pet shops also sell a variety of this, especially made for cats to avoid scratching. Since cats don’t like sticky stuff, you may place a tape on the area on your furniture where your cat scratches the most. Eventually, your cat will learn to avoid scratching on it and if it does, you may remove the tape. If your cat continues scratching on another piece of furniture they you may place a tape on that certain part once again just to give your cat a reminder.

Use claw caps. They can be ordered on the internet or bought in pet shops. These caps can be glued to your cat’s claws and are made up of vinyl, used to protect any surface that the cat might try to scratch. These caps may fall off naturally as your cat’s nails grow, and then you can place another set just to assure that your furniture stays safe from cat scratching. You may keep a scratching post beside the furniture that your cat likes to scratch. Experiment and observe on the textures that your cat loves to scratch. Some prefer carpet, while other may prefer word or cardboard. When you see her getting ready to scratch the sofa, redirect her immediately to the post. When you have placed a tape on the furniture, she will automatically redirect to the post.

Trim your cat’s nails regularly. Just be consistent and patient on doing it until your cat tolerates it. Buy a pair of cat clippers and include it in your daily routine to trim your cat’s nails. If you have accidentally cut your cat’s quick while cutting her nails, you can use a commercial powder, or a cornstarch to stop bleeding. Though it may seem tempting to have your cat declawed, don’t do so for it will cause behavioral problems on your cat. It will be painful for her and she won’t stop the urge to carry out a scratching behavior. It’s much more effective if you will just give her other alternatives for scratching because even though a cat is declawed, she can still cause damage by scratching even with her paws alone.